According to data from 20 of the top 21 life insurance companies in the United States, death claims for working-age adults under group life insurance policies raised well beyond expected levels last summer and fall. The report was by the Society of Actuaries, which analyzed 2.3 million death claims submitted to life insurance firms.

The report examines death claims filed under group life policies during the 24 months since COVID began, between March 2020 and April 2022. According to the report, Death claims for adults aged 35 to 44 were 100 percent higher than expected in July, August, and September 2021. The three years before the pandemic were used to set the baseline for expected death.

The Society of Actuaries asked all of the participating insurance agencies how they identify COVID deaths. They received 18 responses, with 17 of them saying they list COVID as the cause of death if it's listed anywhere on the death certificate and eight of the agencies go a step further and reach out to the families to find out if COVID actually caused the death.

Scott Davison, CEO of the Indianapolis-based life insurance company OneAmerica, was the first person to mention this increase in death. During a virtual press conference on Dec. 30, 2021, that his company and the life insurance industry as a whole was seeing a 40 percent increase in deaths among people ages 18 to 64.

Dr. Robert Malone, a physician who has become controversial for challenging the long-term impacts of the vaccine, says excess mortality must always be studied to determine the effectiveness of a vaccine.

“Excess mortality should be a signal, a trigger,” he said to The Epoch Times. “When we see excess mortality like that—basically if you’re running a clinical trial and you see this kind of excess mortality, you stop the trial. And you investigate the cause before you proceed. And if you’re marketing a drug, generally, with this kind of data, you stop the distribution of the drug until you have sorted it out.”

The report also notes that white-collar workers had the highest number of excess deaths during the two years studied. The group, which includes accountants, lawyers, computer programmers, and most other jobs done in an office setting, had 23 percent more deaths than expected, per The Epoch Times.

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