Last week a group of hackers claiming to be Iranian hacked into one of the U.S. government websites after the death of Iranian Revolutionary Guard Corps General Qasem Soleimani.

The group hacked their way into the U.S. Federal Depository Library Program website which is one of the most meaningless government websites around.

For those who don't know what the U.S. Federal Depository Library Program is, their website says, "The mission of the Federal Depository Library Program (FDLP) is to provide free, ready, and permanent public access to Federal Government information, now and for future generations."

According to The Daily Wire,

Fox News reporter Andres Del Aguila reported that a former senior U.S. Government National Security official told Fox News, “It has the feel of being pretty insignificant … they just hacked a website that most Washington insiders don’t know existed … Honestly, this is not very hard … this website had very weak security.”

Del Aguila added, “The source suspects this hack was not done by the Iranian government but instead by a sympathizer or proxy group.”

The Spectator Index tweeted out a screenshot of the way that the Federal Depository Library Program appeared during the hack.

https://twitter.com/spectatorindex/status/1213633472318726144

In my opinion, whoever it was that did this hacking doesn't look like they really knew what they were doing. They were only able to get into a website that had weak security, to begin with. Mor than likely, rather than being actual Iranians, it was probably group of Iran sympathizers.

Former senior US Government National Security official Leland Vittert said of the hack, "It has the feel of being pretty insignificant...they just hacked a website that most Washington insiders don’t know existed...Honestly, this is not very hard...this website had very weak security."

Tehran is widely considered to be one of the world’s most malicious online actors — alongside China, Russia and North Korea — and has a lengthy rap sheet of transgressions with an increasingly sophisticated arsenal of digital weapons.

One of its specialties is so-called wiper attacks, in which malicious software erases the hard drives of infected computers. Those include a massive 2012 hack on the Saudi Arabian oil company Saudi Aramco that is reported to have debilitated an estimated 30,000 computers. (Politico)

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