Crooked Hillary Is Still Crying, Calls the Electoral College ‘A Little Troubling’

Hillary Clinton still can’t accept defeat. On Friday while speaking at Harvard University’s “Radcliffe Day,” Crooked Hillary referred to the Electoral College as “a little troubling.”

Per Daily Wire:

And finally, I know this is another really obvious thing to say – vote in every election, not just presidential elections. You know, it is maddening because, [as] one of the panelists said, we get the government that we vote for.

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Now, we have this odd system with the Electoral College, and maybe, you know, we could get President Faust to explain the roots of that because it’s a little troubling – but nevertheless we’ve got it. I’ve been against it, by the way, since 2000 – not that you need to know that, but I have been because I just think it is absolutely contrary to one person, one vote.

It’s been over a year and a half since Hillary Clinton lost the election on that magical night in 2016 and she still hasn’t came to terms with why it happened. For the rest of the world, it’s very easy to figure out. The two-time loser was a disaster of a candidate and the whole world knew it. It doesn’t matter how long she wanders through the woods or cries foul, the people spoke and outside of California, most people did not want her as president.

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