Texans Owner Doubles Down On ‘Inmates Running the Prison’ Remark

During the NFL kneeling controversy, a very irritated Texans owner Bob McNair said, “We can’t have the inmates running the prison.” The only thing he regrets about that moment is apologizing.

McNair was condemned by many. Many of the Texans players kneeled during the following game’s National Anthem in protest of their owner.

It’s pretty easy to see McNair was trying to use the well known idiom, “the inmates are running the asylum.” What he meant was the people running the team are the least capable. Instead, by inserting prison, even in a private meeting, it was wildly misconstrued.

take our poll - story continues below

Will the Democrats try to impeach President Trump now that they control the House?

  • Will the Democrats try to impeach President Trump now that they control the House?  

  • This field is for validation purposes and should be left unchanged.
Completing this poll grants you access to Think Americana updates free of charge. You may opt out at anytime. You also agree to this site's Privacy Policy and Terms of Use.

Per Daily Wire:

McNair issued a public apology “to anyone who was offended,” clarifying that he “never meant to offend anyone” and “was not referring to our players.”

“I regret that I used that expression,” McNair said at the time. “I used a figure of speech that was never intended to be taken literally. I would never characterize our players or our league that way.”

Now, it turns out that what McNair most regrets is issuing an apology in the first place.

“The main thing I regret is apologizing,” McNair told The Wall Street Journal in a story published Friday. “I really didn’t have anything to apologize for.”

He said the “inmates” he was referring to in the October meeting were league executives who had too much control over key business decisions.

“We were talking about a number of things, but we were also washing our dirty linen, which you do internally. You don’t do that publicly. That’s what I was addressing: The relationship of owners and the league office,” McNair said.

Asked about players who kneel for the National Anthem, McNair said that players who don’t want to stand should remain in the locker room.

“If they’re going to be out there, we need to respect the anthem and our flag,” he said, intimating that the league should revise its policy to make it mandatory for players on the field to stand for the National Anthem. “As employers, we set conditions for all of our employees.”

With the blowback McNair was facing, it’s easy to see why he apologized. At least he stepped up and cleared the air. His statement was misconstrued. The intent was clear. He wasn’t making a racist statement, he was addressing the relationship between the owners and the league office.

Kudos to Bob McNair for standing his ground.

Previous The Rock Didn't Vote for Trump or Hillary - Here's Why
Next Trump Finally Responds to Stormy Daniels Questions

Join the conversation!

We have no tolerance for comments containing violence, racism, vulgarity, profanity, all caps, or discourteous behavior. Thank you for partnering with us to maintain a courteous and useful public environment where we can engage in reasonable discourse.