Facebook Is Changing Your Newsfeed: Here’s How To See What You Want

In case you haven’t noticed, Facebook is changing your newsfeed. Mark Zuckerberg says you will see posts from friends and family and “trusted sources.”

The only issue with this is who the h*ll wants Facebook to decide who “trusted sources” are? They will determine which sources Facebook designates as “trusted” by taking a “diverse and representative” sample of Facebook users. If a source is not determined to be “trusted” then it will be buried from you. Even if it is a page you follow.

Luckily there is a way to take the power out of Facebook’s hands. You can make sure you get the updates you want from your favorite sites. Here are instructions on how to do so.

1. On your Facebook home page (or in the Facebook app) click the arrow or three lines up in the top right. Down below you need to select “News feed preferences.”

News feed preferences Facebook

2. Select prioritize who to see first. (should be your first option)

prioritize who to see first on facebook

3. Next you need to change the view options to “pages only.” This way you are able to find which pages you want to be shown first in your newsfeed.

Pages in your newsfeed

And then another way to make your newsfeed how you want. Go to the Facebook page that you want to follow closely. Then click on the “following” drop down arrow and select the “see first” option “in your news feed.”

See first on facebook

By taking these steps you are going a long way toward controlling what you see in your newsfeed.

Another thing you can do is to make sure you share posts with your friends and family. This increases the visibility of the pages you support and also helps make sure you continue to view them.

Here is a part of the message Mark Zuckerberg posted with regards to the new platform Facebook is using now:

There’s too much sensationalism, misinformation and polarization in the world today. Social media enables people to spread information faster than ever before, and if we don’t specifically tackle these problems, then we end up amplifying them. That’s why it’s important that News Feed promotes high quality news that helps build a sense of common ground.

The hard question we’ve struggled with is how to decide what news sources are broadly trusted in a world with so much division. We could try to make that decision ourselves, but that’s not something we’re comfortable with. We considered asking outside experts, which would take the decision out of our hands but would likely not solve the objectivity problem. Or we could ask you — the community — and have your feedback determine the ranking.

We decided that having the community determine which sources are broadly trusted would be most objective.

Here’s how this will work. As part of our ongoing quality surveys, we will now ask people whether they’re familiar with a news source and, if so, whether they trust that source. The idea is that some news organizations are only trusted by their readers or watchers, and others are broadly trusted across society even by those who don’t follow them directly. (We eliminate from the sample those who aren’t familiar with a source, so the output is a ratio of those who trust the source to those who are familiar with it.)

This update will not change the amount of news you see on Facebook. It will only shift the balance of news you see towards sources that are determined to be trusted by the community.

Continuing our focus for 2018 to make sure the time we all spend on Facebook is time well spent… Last week I…

Posted by Mark Zuckerberg on Friday, January 19, 2018

Facebook is looking to control what people get to see, even at the expense of costing them on their bottom line. By following the steps above you can take control back and be who is in charge of your newsfeed.

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